New Ferrari Hypercar Could Arrive by 2020

A Ferrari exec says the LaFerrari's successor is 'three to five' years away. 

Ferrari

You can't hold back progress...especially when it comes to supercars. While the Ferrari LaFerrari may still be fresh in all our memories (in part because Maranello moved the last 200(ish) of them in open-top Aperta form just last year), the carmaker is already looking down the tracks to its next limited-production halo car. And that Ferrari hypercar could show up as early as 2020, according to a company executive,

In an interview with Britain's Autocar, Michael Leiters, Ferrari's chief technology officer, said Maranello is currently working on finalizing its innovation and technology plans for the future. Once that's done, he says Ferrari can turn its attention to developing a new halo car that introduces the future tech that will in turn trickle down to the rest of the lineup (much as the LaFerrari's hybrid powertrain is expected to reach the net generation of  production V-12 models that succeed the GTC4Lusso and 812 Superfast). 

"The roadmap will be finished in about six months," he told Autocar, "So my guess is that we could be three to five years away from a new limited-edition hypercar."

He says Ferrari won't follow in Mercedes-AMG's footsteps and whip up a road-going hypercar with the engine of an F1 racer, though. "It won’t be a road car with a Formula 1 engine because, to be realistic, it would need to idle at 2500-3000 rpm and rev to 16,000 rpm," he said. 

It may seem like too soon for a new icon from Maranello, but traditionally, Ferrari has put just shy of a decade between each of its range-topping hypercars. The LaFerrari debuted in 2013, 11 years after the Enzo made its first appearance; that was about eight years after the F50 arrived, which was eight years after the F40 hit the scene. (That car, however, arrived just three years after the 288 GTO.) Considering everyone and their mother seems to be developing a thousand-horsepower, million-dollar-plus sports car these days...we can't blame Ferrari for wanting to show the world how it's done.