Luis Perez’s Photorealistic Car Portraits Are Unbelievable

Why did society take up photography, again?

Luis Perez Art
Luis Perez

Seeing one of Luis Perez’s meticulous paintings for the first time is like trekking through the scorching deserts of West Texas, feet heavy and consciousness waning, then suddenly coming upon Prada Marfa. This cannot be real. It must be an illusion, or some technical trickery—definitely digital. But, no it’s just art. Finely wrought, photorealistic scenes, the products of paint and canvas and an unimaginable amount of time. So look closely. Apply your corneas to your computer screen. Wait for the art to dissolve into blobs and bits. It won’t, because every stroke is perfect.

Luis Perez studied Art History in Spain, where he’s from, and now lives in London. Luckily for New York City petrolheads, though, the artist has also turned his eyes and Flemish-level rendering skills to the city’s cars, producing stunning auto portraits that leave those who see them wondering why, even, photography really caught on. The artist’s latest collection, “City Lights,” continues in that vein, pushing the realism to even more mind-bending heights. Take our favorite painting—a late model Porsche 911 in repose on a shady Brooklyn street. The lustre on the car is inches deep, the metallic exhaust pipes fairly gleam and the taillights, in their complex shape, depth and opacity, are the equal to a Dutch Master’s most virtuosic, wine-filled chalice. Optical illusions don’t always make your eyes cross; sometimes, they make ‘em water.

Luis Perez
Luis Perez
Luis Perez
Luis Perez
Luis Perez
Luis Perez
Luis Perez